Saturday, 4 May 2013

Something for the weekend. Nicely nastic tulips


Lovely Lady-tulips
Peter Williams has let me have these fine pictures of Tulipa clusiana. They were taken in his greenhouse at ten minute intervals. As the morning temperature rises they open extremely rapidly, presenting themselves for potential insect pollination. Later in the day when temperatures fall or light fades, they close. This plant movement is an example of thermonasty, a plant movement in response to temperature. Lady-tulips can be seen  outside in their full glory at Peter’s Open Day tomorrow!






My own naturalised tulip, ‘Little Beauty’  is also thermonastic. Personally, I like tulips in tight bud when they do not open at all on a dull rainy day.

Naturalised from self sown seed

Later in the day

14 comments:

  1. You'll have been loving your tulips recently them Roger :) I have some ordinary Darwin tulips on the plot which I sometimes use as cut flowers. I'm always fascinated as the flowers and stems just keep on growing when they are cut and brought inside.

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    Replies
    1. No, there have not been too many sunny days!
      Bulbs have lasted well this year with it being so cold.

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  2. The "Little Beauty" is aptly named! The contrast of colours is really attractive.

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  3. The first picture of the Tulipa clusiana is gorgeous. The movement of the flowers is beautifully captured. And self sown tulips, so pretty.

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    1. I love it when seedlings emerge in Spring. Many self seeding bulbs seem to germinate their seed at exactly the same time as mature bulbs come through

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  4. I really like both of them. I didn't realize there was some that opened and closed based on the weather. They would be fascinating to watch.
    Cher Sunray Gardens

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    Replies
    1. Even some of the regular varieties do to a small extent but I guess this characteristic has been selected out.

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  5. I'm a big fan of species tulips, and these are especially lovely. My favorites are Tulipa praestans and T. turkestanica.

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    Replies
    1. I think the important message about the species tulips is to let them set seed and spread themselves around.

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  6. I love tulips and you have so many varieties. I would love to grow more myself, but weather and soil really limit what will retain bloom. I like your striped tulips, they are so joyous.

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  7. Every day is a school day for me Roger :) Both lovely tulips you have profiled. I have to say that I much prefer tulips when they are tightly budded - I find them far more interesting to look at. Obvioiusly not so for the pollinators.

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  8. These tulips on the first photos are incredible! I've never seen such variety.

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