Friday, 7 December 2012

All things bright and beautiful


              Beauty in miniature, looking back to November



I won’t call ox-eye daisy a weed any more!
log pile fungi
Sticky centres.  Saxifraga fortunei  ‘Autumn Tribute’
Perfect white droplets. Acis autumnalis, the autumn snowflake

The spider and the fly
Yellow jewel. Sisyrinchium californicum, yellow-eyed grass
 Red spot. Mimulus luteus, monkey flower, normally flowers in Spring
Little red bug, identification please, Daphne ‘Ernst Hauser’ is just 20cm high

Yellow cup, from a self-sown seed of Clematis 'Orange Peel'








13 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. I agree Jason. Brilliant pictures. I loved the spider and the fly!

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  2. Another superb picture post Roger. I loved 'October at Boundary Cottage', but this one is even better.

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    1. Couldn't agree more Grant. I can't tell WHAT that little beetle is though!

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  3. Wonderful photos, so clear.

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  4. It really does illustrate that a picture speaks a thousand words.

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  5. Lovely photos but the title sends a shiver.

    I had been teaching about a week and in assembly our headteacher announced that each teacher would sing solo a verse from ATBAB. My verse was "The purple headed mountain". After a couple of false starts I got going only to be stopped and the children asked to identify what I had done! I didn't know but I had apparently transposed the tune down an octave (or something like that) indicating I was a contralto which was why I couldn't hit the high notes and hate singing songs like ATBAB!

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    1. I only sing when I am on my own in the car with the radio on. Not only am I out of tune, I never find the right words!

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  6. What a wonderful post. I have saxifraga Autumn Tribute and have always thought that the flowers are absolutely beautiful but often overlooked. Your picture shines light on a garden gem!

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    1. I love the autumn saxifrages Kristy, especially those withe bronzy toned foliage. I think mine are actually in a too open position and especially in spring the young growth gets caught by late frost.

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  7. Isn't this just a great reminder of a wonderful year in the garden? It is too easy to settle into the dormancy of winter!

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    Replies
    1. One of the joys of gardening is that there is always something of beauty to see.

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  8. Beautiful photos I particularly enjoyed the bee and the fungi.

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