Saturday, 18 May 2013

An ubiquity of sparrows.



A certain traveller who knew many continents was asked what he found most remarkable of all. He replied the ubiquity of sparrows.
Adam Zagejewski

Just a sparrow

My world
Sparrows go cheep



Early morning they come to my room;
Wake me up with a familiar tune.






Tell me not of joy: there’s none. Now my little sparrows gone.

I once had a sparrow alight upon my shoulder for a moment while I was hoeing in a village garden and felt that I was more distinguished by that circumstance that I should have been by any epaulet I could have worn.                                                              
Henry Thoreau

The genius of Harry Poole. More of Harry’s pictures.


11 comments:

  1. Lovely photos. I love sparrows which are really beautiful birds if time is taken to really notice them. I always wondered at the French word for them 'moineau' and whether the 'moin' beginning meaning 'less' was chosen on purpose as if to say they were less interesting. Now they have red status it's time for us to value them before it's too late.

    Do you have tree sparrows as well?

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    Replies
    1. Moineau is a lovely word. It sounds diminutive. We have a hedge sparrow's nest just outside our ground floor bedroom window.

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    2. Correction Sue, I must have had an extra glass last night, I meant to say a tree sparrow nest!

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  2. What a lovely post Roger! The pictures are beautiful - I have always thought that sparrows are under-rated. I find them fascinating to watch.

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    Replies
    1. Great to hear from you again Poppy.

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  3. Love this one Roger. Photographs are brilliant - love the in-flight ones.

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  4. But there are so many sparrows. Here we have white crowned sparrows, white throated sparrows, fox sparrows - and (sigh) house sparrows. But house sparrows are really finches.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for the info Jason. There are concerns over here about sparrow populations and as Sue hints in her question about tree sparrows these have declined- although round here in Seaton Ross they are very common.

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  5. Great photos! Especially the first one!

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  6. This really cheered me up on a rainy afternoon. All we have in the garden is fat pigeons and predatory magpies.

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  7. Thanks for visiting my blog Helen. I have just enjoyed visiting your own.

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